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Benefits of steaming over soaking

Did you know....

Although soaking hay dampens down 90% of respirable particles, it dramatically increases the bacterial content of the hay - in fact in just 10 minutes by 150% and can go on to 500%!

Soaking also reduces palatability and leaches valuable nutrients; but more concerning is the effect on the environment - post-soak liquid is 9X more polluting than raw sewage.

 

What people say about Haygain steamers

HG Go :

"A little gem. Love it completely. We can travel away to competitions without any worries. Super portable and does the job just like its big brother back home in the yard."

How can Haygain help?

While soaking increases bacteria by 150-500%, steaming hay dramatically reduces bacteria and mould content by up to 99%.

But steamed hay also keeps the nutritional value of the hay in tact, and has no toxic waste;


And the horses love it! A study by Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. and Payne, V. (2012) showed Haygain steamed hay, once tasted was always the first to be consumed.

HG 600 :

"Fantastic. I have had my Haygain steamer just over 2 years and absolutely love it. If I give my horses dry hay it makes them cough but when they have steamed hay the coughing stops. I wouldn't be without it."

HG 2000 :

"Brilliant! Wish we had bought one sooner. The horses love it! Horses which you used to be on soaked hay for health reasons, do very well on the steamed hay. Very economical on water compared to soaking and so easy to use. Would never go back to soaking. A fantastic product, Thank You!"

References:

1. Stockdale, C and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S (2010) Steaming hay for horses: The effect of three different treatments on the respirable particle numbers in hay treated in the Haygain steamer. European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, Cirencester, Sept 2010. The Impact of nutrition on the health and welfare of horses. EAAP publication No. 128. Ed Ellis, A., Longland, A.C., Coenen, M and Miraglia, N. p136-138

2. Moore-Colyer, M.J.S and Fillery, B.G. (2012) The Effect of three different treatments on the respirable particle content, total viable count and mould concentrations in hay for horses. 6th European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, Lisbon, Portugal, June. 101- 106.

3. Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. Taylor, J. and James, R (2015). The effect of steaming and soaking on the respirable particle, bacteria, mould and nutrient content in hay for horses. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. Aug 2015

4. Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. Taylor, J. and James, R (2015). The effect of steaming and soaking on the respirable particle, bacteria, mould and nutrient content in hay for horses. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. Aug 2015

5. Wyss, U. and Pradervand, N. (2016) Steaming or Soaking. Agroscope Science. Nr 32 p32-33

 

6. Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. and Payne, V. (2012) Palatability and ingestion behaviour of 6 polo ponies offered a choice of dry, soaked and steamed hay for 1 hour on three separate occasions. Advances in Animal Biosciences. Healthy Food from Healthy Animals. Vol 3 part 1. 127

7. Brown, E., Tracey, S and Gowers, I. (2013) An investigation to determine the palatability of steamed hay, dry hay and haylage. Proceedings of British Society of Animal Science Conference, Nottingham April 2013. p 104

8. James, R. and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. (2013) Hay for horses: The nutrient content of hay before and after steam treatment in a commercial hay steamer. Proceedings of British Society of Animal Science Conference, Nottingham April 2013.

9. Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. Taylor, J. and James, R (2015). The effect of steaming and soaking on the respirable particle, bacteria, mould and nutrient content in hay for horses. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. Aug 2015

10. Warr EM, Petch JL (1992) Effects of soaking hay on its nutritional quality. Eq.Vet.Edu. 5:169–171.